The Most Divisive Issue In England Today #limerick

Esther’s limerick prompt has driven me into a controversy that may mean me having to shut my blog. It is undoubtedly one of the biggest divides in England today. The prompt is Scone.

For some, jam first is just not done,
While cream first, and you’re all alone.
The bigger dilemma
Is really whether
You call it a ‘scon’ or a ‘scone’.

About TanGental

My name is Geoff Le Pard. Once I was a lawyer; now I am a writer. I've published several books: a four book series following Harry Spittle as he grows from hapless student to hapless partner in a London law firm; four others in different genres; a book of poetry; four anthologies of short fiction; and a memoir of my mother. I have several more in the pipeline. I have been blogging regularly since 2014, on topic as diverse as: poetry based on famous poems; memories from my life; my garden; my dog; a whole variety of short fiction; my attempts at baking and food; travel and the consequent disasters; theatre, film and book reviews; and the occasional thought piece. Mostly it is whatever takes my fancy. I avoid politics, mostly, and religion, always. I don't mean to upset anyone but if I do, well, sorry and I suggest you go elsewhere. These are my thoughts and no one else is to blame. If you want to nab anything I post, please acknowledge where it came from.
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65 Responses to The Most Divisive Issue In England Today #limerick

  1. Scon; and cream (though I don’t like the stuff) first.
    Fun ditty!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. joylennick says:

    I like the limerick, but have ‘gone off’ scons as they stick to the roof of my mouth…(jam then cream.) x

    Like

    • TanGental says:

      The scone/scon recipe is such a delicate one. Mind you if it’s hanging on like a demented cake-bat I understand why you’d move on to other tea time treats

      Like

  3. Ruth says:

    Personally I prefer real butter to jam and cream, and I don’t care what they’re called as long as they’re light and fluffy and not over-worked 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. gordon759 says:

    And then what, if anything, should you put on a cheese scone?

    Liked by 1 person

  5. A cream of a poem

    Liked by 1 person

  6. If you need to go into hiding let me know. I know someone!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Let me throw in one more. Who put the blueberries in the scone batter and thought they could get away with it? Jam then clotted cream. Now and then lemon curd is tasty. These are issues that haunt the soul.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. noelleg44 says:

    Scone and jam first, but then I live on the other side of the pond!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. willowdot21 says:

    Oh! Please we have had this discussion before…
    In didn’t end well 💜

    Liked by 1 person

  10. arlingwoman says:

    I don’t see that it matters. It would depend on the texture of the jam and the body of the cream if one is to be practical. As for scon and scone, I read once that the word scone came from the Gaelic sgonn, and that looks like it might sound like scon. But I’ll only have to worry about that if I ever get back to the UK.

    Liked by 2 people

    • TanGental says:

      If you end up in Devon and Cornwall, you had really better educate yourself on the whole issue. It can lead to all sorts of consequences to get it wrong

      Like

  11. Erika says:

    Haha, great!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. JT Twissel says:

    I take it the cream goes first and then the jam?

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Ritu says:

    Look, I don’t care of the order, as long as you say it like it is… ScOWn!!!!!

    Like

  14. tootlepedal says:

    There is no controversy, just people who are wrong (which rhymes with scone).

    Liked by 2 people

  15. CARAMELODY says:

    lol -to those who bicker, my reply is “just put a scone in it!”

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Mick Canning says:

    Cheese scon. And butter.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. V.M.Sang says:

    Well, Geoff, it has an e on the end, which by the rules mean the o is long. (As exemplified by your spelling in your last line.)
    Funnily enough, the discussion came up with a friend yesterday. We both agreed that if you put the cream on first, how the heck do you spread the jam?

    Liked by 1 person

  18. V.M.Sang says:

    My New Year resolution is to write a poem a day. You inspired me for today’s poem, Geoff, but not about the cream jam controversy, important as that is, but to write about the pronunciation. Here’s my effort.

    Today I heard a great debate
    About a simple, little cake.
    I wonder now how it is named.
    Get it wrong and you’ll be blamed.
    Is it scon, with a short o?
    Someone’s sure to tell you so.
    But then, of course someone will moan
    That it is really called a scone.
    In Scotland there’s a little town
    Where Scottish kings were always crowned.
    It is called Scone, but pretty soon
    We learn the Scots folk call it Skoon.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Scon no E. Scone with an E is posh yorkshire. We drop E’s where I come from and save them up fir saying things like EEE lad.

    Liked by 2 people

    • TanGental says:

      Yes, I did wonder what you chaps were hoarding ees for. And I have been to Harrogate which made my mother’s snobbery seem amateurish. Played cricket there; the only tea I ever had in a cricket match were doilies were in use. And we were offered fancies. I wasn’t entirely sure how to take that

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  20. Widdershins says:

    Over here they call ’em ‘biscuits’! My ghast had never been so flabbered when I found out! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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