Philately Friday – No. 1

I’ve been perusing the first day covers I’ve inherited form Dad and they are such a range of little pieces of art and history that it seems a shame not to share some with you.

To start the process, I’ve found four that are American First Day of Issues. The earliest is from 1947 and refences the postal service, including the Pony Express by the looks of it.

The next two are from 1949. The first is so intriguing. How many of you know what the GAR references? It’s the Grand Army of the Republic and which was formed after the Civil War to honour the Union side’s soldiers, to support them and to keep alive the memory of what they fought for and why. By 1949, there were sixteen left of whom 6 travelled to the final convention. The youngest was 100, the oldest 108! Have a read here. It’s worth it to follow the story of Joseph Clovese who was born into slavery and ran away at 17 to fight with the North and made it to the final convention. And, but for a stamp, I’d never have heard of the GAR or this remarkable survivor.

and finally from 1950

A Lot of the First Day Covers reference anniversaries, of course. This one, the 50th anniversary of the creation of the Royal Air Force has a certain poignancy as my grandfather was one of those original pilots who survived the Royal Flying Corps in WW1 to become part of the RAF

I never knew him, sadly. The injuries he suffered during that appalling conflict did for him in 1940, as he reached his own 50th. See, these things have their emotional impact, don’t they?

About TanGental

My name is Geoff Le Pard. Once I was a lawyer; now I am a writer. I've published several books: a four book series following Harry Spittle as he grows from hapless student to hapless partner in a London law firm; four others in different genres; a book of poetry; four anthologies of short fiction; and a memoir of my mother. I have several more in the pipeline. I have been blogging regularly since 2014, on topic as diverse as: poetry based on famous poems; memories from my life; my garden; my dog; a whole variety of short fiction; my attempts at baking and food; travel and the consequent disasters; theatre, film and book reviews; and the occasional thought piece. Mostly it is whatever takes my fancy. I avoid politics, mostly, and religion, always. I don't mean to upset anyone but if I do, well, sorry and I suggest you go elsewhere. These are my thoughts and no one else is to blame. If you want to nab anything I post, please acknowledge where it came from.
This entry was posted in first day covers, miscellany, stamps and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

23 Responses to Philately Friday – No. 1

  1. This is a really fascinating series

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Darlene says:

    Your grandfather was very handsome. Too bad you didn’t get to know him. The stamps are very interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. A fascinating article on the GAR. Looking forward to your Friday posts!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. noelleg44 says:

    These are remarkable, Geoff! I loved the Pony Express one – part of our magical history.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I am enjoying this series, Geoff.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. JT Twissel says:

    What treasures! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Erika says:

    The first two dates made me smile. 1947 and 1949 are the birth years of my parents.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Jennie says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed these! I must confess I did not know of the GAR. Washington and Lee (we call it W & L) is near and dear to my family. The Pony Express is a treat, as it was a short-lived service. You saved the best for last- this must have been your father’s pride and joy.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Elizabeth says:

    My mother was keen on first day covers and got my brother and I excited about them too. He and I also sent off for little packets of stamps “on approval” which we bought some of and sent the rest back. I have many of the Empire because he and I loved seeing the King.

    Liked by 1 person

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