If Parasite Was Half As Nice (with apologises to Amen Corner) #filmreview #parasite

There’s been a lot of chittery-chatter around this Oscar hoover of a film. It knocked the much liked 1917 out of the running so did it justify the eulogising vaunted on it?

Well, yes it’s an enjoyable movie. The story moves along at a satisfactory pace. The characters are soon coming to life. Simply put a down at heel family of four inveigle themselves into the employ of a wealthy if rather naive family and, as per the title appear to be parasites, twisting their distracted employers’ needs to their own ends making themselves indispensable.

There are clever little twists, neat vignettes like when the two children of the hard up family go hunting for a free Wi-Fi signal, much like possessed Pokemon Go players looking for some cockroach character.

There are neat running gags: Mr Kim’s particular odour is often discussed as others try to describe it ‘a sort of radish, do you think’ – there is to be a sting in the tail here which I won’t spoil.

It’s grim in parts, gross in others, clunky in some and some of the jokes are rather telegraphed even if still funny, like the cringe worthy sex scene. The ending romps away with the madness of a Michael Winner tour de force. I enjoyed it.

But for me the fatal flaw, and one that’s inherent in something where the pacing and humour depends on dialogue and character like this film, comes in that old tired problem of the two foot barrier at the bottom of the screen. Subtitles.

Characters lose their depth, the prose becomes homogenised , the acting is stilted and uniform. I expect the critical acclaim comes because the judges are better at seeing past that filter to the quality beyond. Sadly, I’m not and so the film flattens to two dimensions when it might have soared into a parallel, multi-dimensional and surreal world.

Do give it a go: I’m sure it’s worthy of you time. But for this viewer, and sorry for being a bit of a Little English Speaker here, 1917 is a film I will happily settle down to watch again. I feel I’ve happily ticked this particular box, thanks.

And Amen Corner? Which was near where I once lived in Tooting after which this 1960s London band took its name?

Here you go..

About TanGental

My name is Geoff Le Pard. Once I was a lawyer; now I am a writer. I've published four books - Dead Flies and Sherry Trifle, My Father and Other Liars, Salisbury Square and Buster & Moo. In addition I have published three anthologies of short stories and a memoir of my mother. More will appear soon. I will try and continue to blog regularly at geofflepard.com about whatever takes my fancy. I hope it does yours too. These are my thoughts and no one else is to blame. If you want to nab anything I post, please acknowledge where it came from.
This entry was posted in Film, miscellany, review and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to If Parasite Was Half As Nice (with apologises to Amen Corner) #filmreview #parasite

  1. Ritu says:

    I’m intrigued by both, but to.be honest 1917 is more a film I’m pulled towards watching.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. JT Twissel says:

    Sounds like a fair review. The only movies I can watch with subtitles are in French or are starring children!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. willowdot21 says:

    I have heard the film is brilliant, I might get hubby to see the film as I have been training him up on Scandinavian Crime thrillers!
    I always liked Amen Corner, liked your pun on Parasite and Paradise! I know the Amen Corner in Tooting but did you there is an Amen Corner about 5miles away from where I live in Berkshire 💜

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Mary Smith says:

    Good review and I still want to see it. And 1917.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Elizabeth says:

    I am glad to know that you get annoyed by subtitles also. I have blamed myself ever since college for being unintellectual because I got frustrated by all those subtitles in “deep” Swedish movies. Of course maybe I would have been frustrated by the Swedish too.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. George says:

    I always think if you can forget there are subtitles, the film is really working its magic. I did that with a recent episode of Wisting, where I imagined I could make a brief foray into the kitchen and still follow what was going on by ear. Only then did it dawn on me that they weren’t speaking English.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Mary Smith Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.