A Woman Of Much Importance #carrotranch #flashfiction

May 31, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about warrior women. It can be myth or everyday mothers and wives. Go where the prompt leads.

Fighting The Invisible Enemy

‘How are you, Morgan?’

‘At a loss, Logan.’

‘She’s fighting, though, knowing your ma.’

‘I’m not… you know, I don’t get that whole ‘fighting cancer’ thing’

‘She’s not giving up, is she?’

‘But she ain’t exactly waving her sword either. I mean you can’t will the effing thing away.’

‘What they saying?’

‘Not much. Just more tests. You know what’s hard? She’s always argued. She’d diss a lamppost if it got in her way, but she just lies there, doing nothing. No swearing, not even a hairy eyeball.’

‘Come here. You need to stop fighting yourself.’

‘It sucks, mate.’

About TanGental

My name is Geoff Le Pard. Once I was a lawyer; now I am a writer. I've published four books - Dead Flies and Sherry Trifle, My Father and Other Liars, Salisbury Square and Buster & Moo. In addition I have published two anthologies of short stories, Life, in a Grain of Sand and Life in a Flash. More will appear soon, including a memoir of my mother's last years. I will try and continue to blog regularly at geofflepard.com about whatever takes my fancy. I hope it does yours too. These are my thoughts and no one else is to blame. If you want to nab anything I post, please acknowledge where it came from.
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42 Responses to A Woman Of Much Importance #carrotranch #flashfiction

  1. That hits home. I don’t get the ‘after a brave struggle against cancer’ thing either. You don’t, can’t fight it, just try and make the going easier on the ones you love.

    Liked by 2 people

    • trifflepudling says:

      I agree. The whole terminology they use is so dire. It helps nobody.

      Liked by 1 person

      • It makes it sound as if they could have ‘defeated’ the disease if only they’d fought a bit harder. Also that it’s somehow brave to suffer from cancer. My great uncle’s wife had breast cancer and never told anyone because she was nursing my great uncle who almost died of pneumonia and other lung-related complications. When he recovered, it was too late for her to have treatment and she died. She didn’t ‘fight’ or ‘struggle’ it was self-sacrifice, quiet and undramatic. But she still died.

        Liked by 1 person

      • TanGental says:

        Thank you for sharing that. Everyone has their own approach. My father died of Prostate cancer and he railed against everything and if there was a fight to be had he’d have been in that ring but the fighting such as it was were the chemicals of chemo. I felt his frustration that there was nothing he could fight but the concern of his family. Horrid but the battle came too late.

        Like

      • That sounds much more realistic. My mother died of pancreatic cancer three weeks before her appointment for a biopsy that she only got because my sister went down to the hospital and threatened to break somebody’s neck if she didn’t get one. So we never knew what she had until she was dead. She spent the last weeks of her life tidying up so she wouldn’t be leaving a mess for somebody else to clear up. Call it fighting if you like, but I think it’s more a resignation that death can’t be voided by ‘fighting’.

        Liked by 1 person

      • TanGental says:

        That’s horrid and the idea she didn’t fight or failed in her fight insults what she was and what she tried to do.

        Like

      • It’s probably a sign of the subtle sexism we have lived with for so long that we haven’t even noticed it. Of course the only heroic course has always involved fighting. Strength means beating brains out, not quietly getting on with what needs to be done. Maybe it will change. I hope so.

        Liked by 1 person

      • TanGental says:

        one day we will learn – so long as we elect less Trumps of course

        Like

      • That will mean we have learned. The problem is that Trump is not alone—he represents hundreds of millions, all thinking like him, all approving his idiocy. It’s that that has to change, the ignorance that makes people hero worship heartlessness and cruelty.

        Liked by 1 person

      • TanGental says:

        Thanks Gilly my experience precisely

        Like

    • TanGental says:

      I replied to your later comment about my experiences. I don’t want to minimise how anyone deals with this awful disease but fighting and battling seems at odds with what is needed. Focus and determination to did what it takes but a fight? Mo I don’t think that’s what it is

      Liked by 1 person

      • trifflepudling says:

        I am very sorry to hear that, Jane. An extraordinarily selfless thing to do.
        The language used around this illness makes me very angry and needs drastic rethinking. As if the whole thing isn’t cruel and unkind enough without that added traumatic image.
        I hope your great-uncle had a good few years after that.
        And Geoff, I hope the lady in your story recovered, at least in spirit!

        Liked by 1 person

      • TanGental says:

        Thanks Gilly. I think we’re on the same page with this language thing

        Like

      • No, I don’t think the battle analogies are the right ones. It implies winners and losers, as if the person who is sick is somehow in control, and if they lose, it’s because they didn’t fight hard enough.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. rogershipp says:

    heart-breaking…

    Liked by 1 person

  3. the part you said about not being able to will cancer away, that was great. I really enjoyed this piece!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. You can fight it with treatment if you choose to, or you can give up. Depends on your state of mind. I chose to fight mine with radiotherapy. It took the cancer away, but now I’m fighting against the bloody awful side effects.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ritu says:

    This is so sad…

    Liked by 1 person

  6. JT Twissel says:

    If only people had a fighting chance against cancer or any major disease for that matter. Maybe someday but I don’t think we’re there yet. Sad.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Well, that opened an interesting conversation! Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Absolutely says it all. My dad would have also fought if he had a chance in hell, but of course, no chance at all. A brilliant piece of writing Geoff, (I’m loving your book too!!)

    Liked by 1 person

  9. willowdot21 says:

    It is just like that someties 💜

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Very, very sad, Geoff. There seems to be such a growing trend with cancer it is most frightening.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Pingback: Warrior Women « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

  12. Annecdotist says:

    Great flash and totally agree with the sentiment. And the beautiful moth?

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Norah says:

    It does suck, and not just for the one suffering physically. Well told. I agree with your other readers – beautiful pic.

    Liked by 1 person

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