The Re-Cycle Of Life

A couple of years ago, we decided to use up some old bits and bobs to make a bug home in our garden. The first buggery appeared shortly after and now we have four residential bug-blocks and a host of small sub-buglets.

The thing is that when you start out with this whole re/up-cycling schermozzle you cant stop. Which meant that, when our current two compost bins began to collapse we began a hunt for bits and bobs to replace them.

We asked our neighbours for old pallets we saw stacked in their garden waiting to go to the dump. We took some old doors from the Lawyers flat and we kept back the pond liner I rather stupidly tore when the first attempt to make a pond fell apart a few years ago.

The result is a rather splendid run of new compost bins – we now have four – and a corner shelter for the spades and larger tools.

I’m knackered but rather pleased.

And here a few pics from the green shoots of spring that are beginning to peek out in our garden. Things must be improving as Vicky, the family tortoise, is making her annual bid for freedom from her hibernation box.

About TanGental

My name is Geoff Le Pard. Once I was a lawyer; now I am a writer. I've published four books - Dead Flies and Sherry Trifle, My Father and Other Liars, Salisbury Square and Buster & Moo. In addition I have published two anthologies of short stories, Life, in a Grain of Sand and Life in a Flash. More will appear soon, including a memoir of my mother's last years. I will try and continue to blog regularly at geofflepard.com about whatever takes my fancy. I hope it does yours too. These are my thoughts and no one else is to blame. If you want to nab anything I post, please acknowledge where it came from.
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49 Responses to The Re-Cycle Of Life

  1. Lovely! We are currently using a Hippo bag for a compost bin, and the Man Closet now has a mate in the shape of a Man Chest which was reduced to less than half price. Rakes and brooms still don’t fit, but Hubby may improvise with a makeshift ‘tallboy’ in the corner.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Great constructions and encouraging signs

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mary Smith says:

    Love the bug village. Looking at your pics I can see everything is so much further on with you than up here.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Janet Gogerty says:

    Love the bug blocks – my insect hotel is a pile of branches twixt fence and shed.

    Like

  5. Lucy Brazier says:

    I’m glad that pond lining gets a new lease of life!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. davidprosser says:

    OMG, your back garden is big enough to contain Easter Island? And it’s nearly Good Friday too.
    Hugs

    Liked by 1 person

  7. We’ve moved our composters to a safe distance, they were attracting visitors. Thanks for reminding me that we ought to plant some flowering currantβ€”I miss it. Oh, and I think I ought to point out that the correct expression for low density buggery development is the bugalow.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Akkk! Umm Geoff… Buggery does not mean bug hotel over here… o_O.
    Anyway, I wasn’t familiar with bug houses — they’re a very cool idea. I can see why you’re having fun with it. Hugs!

    Like

  9. willowdot21 says:

    Looking good as usual πŸ’œπŸ’œ

    Like

  10. Love the variety of bug dwellings – you’ve created a veritable bug village. You just need to put some signage up with suitable names…. I noted the Easter Island head peeking through the hellebores – it looks fabulous. Happy Easter and Spring!!
    PS I’ll be posting a LightCatcher your way straight after Easter.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Anabel Marsh says:

    Sheds new light on telling someone to get to buggery. Which I’m sure a gent like you never does of course.

    Like

  12. Looks like a lovely place for both bugs and humans! I miss not having a gardening space – one of the downsides of city life!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Mick Canning says:

    Go Vicky, Quick! They’re not looking! Over the wall!

    Liked by 1 person

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